My husband and I spent one evening and one full day in Budapest. Part of our visit included a walking tour on the Buda side of the Danube, which is the preferred side. Unsurprisingly, Pest is found on the other side of the river!

The Hungarians love color and ornamentation, as was apparent in their older buildings.

Photo taken in June 2016, from Budapest, Hungary, on the Buda side of the Danube River, which shows row housing, with four distinct two-story buildings, and one shown prominently. The prominent building has a restaurant on the lower level with five small overhanging arches overlooking outdoor seating. Five old-fashioned windows in the upper story overlook a cobbled street. The building has a unique painted design in the old Hungarian style in terra cotta and goldenrod yellow. A similar building is beside the first one, but it is painted all white with Hungarian words written above the arches.

This row of buildings is typical of the Old Hungarian Style, which we saw on the Buda side of the Danube. The interesting pattern of terra cotta and golden yellow was eye-catching, but it didn’t look out of place. I love this way this building is painted, especially the way the pattern gives the building exterior a three-dimensional textured look.

[Photo taken in June 2016, from Budapest, Hungary, on the Buda side of the Danube River, which shows a partial side view of the gothic-styled Matthias Church, also known as Church of Our Lady of Buda. People and vehicles are in the fore and middle ground. The ornate double doors are open, and typical gothic architecture and embellishments, such as a rose window and trefoil arches rise up from the doors. Two long relatively narrow windows soar up to the roofline, and a side view of the elements of the gothic tower rise up past the roof line, but the tower itself is not shown on this photo. The roof is primarily tiled with terra cotta tiles, but a beautiful pattern is created using white, dark and mint green accent tiles.

This is Matthias Church, also known as Church of Our Lady of Buda built (or, more correctly, renovated) in the Gothic style. The terra cotta and vibrant yellow colors are two that I noticed with some regularity among the older buildings, in addition to the bold patterns.

[A photo taken in June 2016, from Budapest, Hungary, on the Buda side of the Danube River, which shows a two-story residential building in goldenrod yellow with cream trim on the windows and door. There are six upper story casement windows, with assorted baroque pediments. There are four lower story windows, two on each side of a massive green double door, which is flanked by square columns and topped by a pediment which repeats elements from the two outermost upper windows.]

I came across this building on a quiet residential street, and I liked it because of the bold goldenrod color and the massive door. Stylistically there are three things that I noticed about this building. First, I want to point out that there are three different styles of pediments topping each of the upper story windows. The two on the ends are identical, then the next two toward the middle are the same, as are the middle two window pediments. The second point is the plainness of the lower windows. I would guess this is because the door is the center of attention on the lower level. The third feature of interest was that elements from the two outer window pediments are repeated, but in a different format, in the door pediment. For example, the scrolls are on the edge of the window pediment, but are centered together over the door. It is difficult to tell from my photo, but I suspect that many elements from all three pediment styles are repeated in the door pediment.